HI-TEST strongly believes in the power of collaboration and relevant information exchange to improve the productivity of our customers when it is in the best interest of the service men and women that serve our country. We offer educational training in the fields of shock and vibration through the following courses:

Practical-Shock                         Mechanical-Shock

At the first Shock and Vibration Symposium in 1947, mechanical shock was defined as “a sudden and violent change in the state of motion of the component parts or particles of a body or medium resulting from the sudden application of a relatively large external force, such as a blow or impact.” Since then the specific words used have changed somewhat but the meaning remains the same. Most analysts treat shock as a transient vibration. No matter how it is described or what source produced it, the effects of mechanical shock on structures and equipment create major design problems for a wide variety of systems.

This 5-day course will provide a comprehensive treatment of practical shock design and analytical shock simulation with special emphasis on requirements, methods, and procedures for naval qualification for shock produced by underwater explosion by both test and analytical means. Participants will increase their knowledge and understanding of the analytical and experimental tools that are available for shock design and qualification particularly with respect to requirements that are imposed for shipboard equipment. Classroom lectures will provide a basic review of vibration and shock theory and will present the analytical and experimental methodology in the context of particular design applications. Analytical lectures will emphasize the physical significance of the results. Examples and case histories will be used as illustrations of design approaches; workshop problems that involve class participation will be used to advantage throughout the course. Class members will be encouraged to propose real design problems. The instructors will provide guidance for solutions or the problems may be used as class exercises.

The course will be especially useful to those concerned with shock design and/or qualification of structures, machinery, and equipment for U.S. Navy combatant vessels. Current applicable acquisition programs include DDG 51, DDG 1000, LPD 17, SSN 774, OHIO Replacement, CVN 78, LHA 6, LCS 1&2, FF, as well as fleet upgrades and service life extensions.

Although this course is aimed primarily at shock design applications on naval vessels, the analysis and design techniques presented are equally applicable to design and modeling related to seismic shock, blast induced ground shock, pyroshock, gun fire shock, ballistic shock and vehicle mobility shock.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to Mechanical Shock
  • Review of Basic Vibration Theory and SDOF Systems
  • Navy Shock Qualification Process
  • Shock Qualification by Extension
  • Shock Qualifications by Test
  • Underwater Shock Phenomena
  • Shock Qualification by DDAM
  • Practical Design Considerations
  • Optimum Foundation Design
  • Shock Measurement
  • Overview of the Shock Response Spectrum (SRS)
  • 2-Dimensional Normal Mode Theory
  • 3-Dimensional Normal Mode Theory
  • Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Systems
  • Special Design and Analysis Tools
  • Use of Finite Element Analysis for DDAM Transient Analysis
  • Comparison of MDOF System Response from Transient Analysis and SRS/Mode Superposition

INSTRUCTORS

Dr. Edward Alexander
Dr. Alexander has 46 years of experience in the defense and nuclear industries. He has Mechanical Engineering degrees from Oregon State University (BS), Carnegie-Mellon University (MS) and University of Minnesota (PhD) and is a licensed PE in the State of Pennsylvania. He is a former member of the Industrial Affiliates Board for Oregon State University’s Department of Mechanical, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering and current member of the Shock & Vibration Exchange Advisory Committee. Dr. Alexander has done extensive research in the synthesis of acceleration wave forms to be compatible with prescribed shock response and energy spectra. He currently manages the Applied Mechanics Section of the BAE Systems Platforms & Services, Weapon Systems Site, in Minneapolis, MN.

Jerry Hill
Mr. Hill has over 36 years of experience in ship design, survivability and weapons effects, including underwater explosion (UNDEX) analysis, structural design, environmental qualification, and testing. He has extensive experience in: application of analytical techniques for simulation of dynamic loading and response, testing and measurement methods, vibration of structure and machinery, and design optimization for the dynamic environment. He has participated in UNDEX design, qualification, and verification e orts on every major U.S. Navy surface ship program since the early 80’s. He has Bachelors and Masters degrees in Mechanical Engineering and is a Licensed Professional Engineer. He is currently manager of the Ship Integrity Section at Alion Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia.

Jeff Morris
Mr. Morris is a Mechanical Engineer and has served HI-TEST Laboratories, Inc. as a test engineer for over 25 years. He regularly designs interface text fixtures and auxiliary systems to support lightweight and medium weight shock testing and vibration test operations. He has designed special test platforms and unique auxiliary systems. Mr. Morris leads the lightweight, medium weight and vibration testing from designing fixtures to writing the test report. Mr. Morris’ excellent organizational skills have awarded him the opportunity to coordinate all planning and scheduling for test projects issued to HI-TEST. He serves as lead engineer for MIL- STD-167 vibration testing, MIL- STD-740 structural and airborne noise testing, and MIL-S-901D lightweight and medium weight shock testing.

Mechanical Shock may be defined as a sudden change in velocity and is a major design consideration for a wide variety of systems. The structural response to mechanical shock must be measured and characterized during the engineering development of these systems so that they will survive all environments during their service lifetime. These environments may include (but are not limited to): handling and transportation shocks, shocks during system delivery to a target, and shock originating from an explosive or pyrotechnic event. These different shock environments have a velocity change range from about 1 meter per second to 51 meters per second (40 – 2000 ips). Conversely acceleration magnitudes range from <1 g in earthquakes to 200,000 g in differentiated LDV measured pyroshocks. This Mechanical Shock Testing & Data Analysis Short Course will provide a comprehensive treatment of mechanical shock test techniques and data analysis for shocks from 100g to 200,000g. Mechanical shock instrumentation from low frequency techniques for underwater explosions to high frequency techniques for ballistic shock will be reviewed in detail along with the techniques and data analyses to evaluate the instrumentation measuring these shocks. This course is highly recommended for all lead technicians and managers of environmental test laboratories. Managers and engineers on projects requiring shock testing will benefit greatly. Mechanical shock test techniques from package testing to conventional mechanical shock machines to pyroshock simulations and Hopkinson bar techniques will be presented. Design procedures for mechanical shock equipment will be discussed in detail. Where possible, theoretical bases for mechanical shock test techniques are provided. Mechanical shock data analysis and interpretation will be a major focus of all presentations and discussions and will include shock data examination and editing as well as interpolation, trend removal, and integration with MATLAB. This course includes the state-of-the-art shock data evaluation techniques to detect “BAD” data, techniques to salvage “BAD” data and requirement for data acquisition systems to collect “GOOD” data. Complete details of Pseudo Velocity Shock Spectra (PVSS) technology and applications including the following:

  • PVSS on four coordinate paper (4CP) defines Shock severity level
  • Severe shock frequency range defined by the PVSS plateau
  • PVSS measurement of shock isolation protection
  • Maximum modal stress given by the PVSS
  • PVSS measurement of filtering; fast digital filter
  • PVSS calculation ramp invariant filter theory
  • Shock polarity measurement with the damped PVSS
  • Converting SRS plots to approximate PVSS for severity evaluation
  • PVSS analysis of all simple shocks shows them all equally severe
  • Continuous systems maximum stress from PVSS
  • Max modal velocity is proportional max modal stress
  • Evaluation of equipment shock fragility
  • Damage capacity you are hidden by data filtering
    • PVSS on four coordinate paper (4CP) defines Shock severity level
    • Severe shock frequency range defined by the PVSS plateau
    • PVSS measurement of shock isolation protection
    • Maximum modal stress given by the PVSS
    • PVSS measurement of filtering; fast digital filter
    • PVSS calculation ramp invariant filter theory
    • Shock polarity measurement with the damped PVSS
    • Converting SRS plots to approximate PVSS for severity evaluation
    • PVSS analysis of all simple shocks shows them all equally severe
    • Continuous systems maximum stress from PVSS
    • Max modal velocity is proportional max modal stress
    • Evaluation of equipment shock fragility
    • Damage capacity you are hidden by data filtering

INSTRUCTOR:

Dr. Vesta I. Bateman
Dr. Bateman is a mechanical shock specialist and retired from Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico after twenty-seven years of service. She was the Facility Leader for the Mechanical Shock Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories where she was responsible for a wide spectrum of mechanical shock testing including drop table, Hopkinson bar, horizontal pneumatic actuator, rocket rail, live pyroshock, and pyroshock simulation shock tests. She has developed a unique shock isolator for a high shock, high frequency accelerometer as well as the test techniques and data analyses required to evaluate accelerometers and isolated accelerometers. These technologies have been transferred to industry through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA’s). Dr. Bateman also developed high frequency Hopkinson bar testing with bars made of beryllium and a technique for reconstruction of dynamic forces from accelerometer measurements to assess material crush characteristics. A paper by Dr. Bateman and her co-authors won the 1992 Henry Pusey Best Paper Award at the Shock and Vibration Symposium. She was awarded the IEST Edward O. Szymkowiak Award in 2003 for her leadership in Pyroshock Testing. She is the author of two chapters in Harris’ Shock and Vibration Handbook, the ISO Secondary Shock Calibration Standard, and the IEST Pyroshock Testing Recommended Practice as well as over 100 journal and conference papers and reports. Dr. Bateman has a Ph.D from University of Arizona and taught for four years at Virginia Tech at the beginning of her career.

  • 2017 PRACTICAL COURSE DATES

    CLASS CLOSED
    July 10 – 14, 2017 in Minneapolis, MN

    REGISTER NOW
    September 11-15 in Newport, RI

    REGISTER NOW
    December 4-8 in Jacksonville, FL

    REGISTRATION & FEES

    Course registration is $2250 per student and includes a comprehensive set of course notes, a compilation of papers by the instructors, a text book Naval Shock Analysis & Design by Rudolph J. Scavuzzo and Henry C. Pusey and lunch daily. Registrations are fully transferable to any person within the same organization. Participants will receive a certificate worth 3 CEUs* upon completion of the course.

    *CEUs may vary be state and/or association granting accreditation.

  • 2017 MECHANICAL COURSE DATES

    CLASS CLOSED
    June 27-27 in Monterey, CA

    REGISTER NOW
    August 8-10 in Albuquerque, NM

    REGISTER NOW
    September 26-28 in Atlanta, GA

    REGISTRATION & FEES

    Course registration is $1700 per student and includes a comprehensive set of course notes, a compilation of papers by the instructors, a text book Shock Data Analysis by Rudolph J. Scavuzzo and Henry C. Pusey, and lunch daily. Registrations are fully transferable to any person within the same organization. Participants will receive a certificate worth 3 CEUs* upon completion of the course.

    *CEUs may vary be state and/or association granting accreditation

     

Limited travel budget? Schedule on-site training at your facility.